Accessibility at Blazing Swan

One in five people in Western Australia has a disability and, with their families and carers, they form a significant part of the community.

The chance of having a disability increases with age. Less than 5 per cent of people under five years have a disability while this rises to 50 per cent for people aged over 60 years.

Blazing Swan has always been an open and radically inclusive place. But for those people with a disability it has not always been possible to attend for a variety of accessibilty concerns or issues.

Each year we work towards a city that is more and more inclusive of everyone.

For Blazing Swan 2020, we’re proud to annouce that a number of steps are being taken to help with improving our accessbility. This page aims to help document these, as well as provide advice and tips to those wishing to attend as well as those helping others with disabilities to attend the event.

If you have concerns or questions please contact – access(at)blazingswan.com.au

The Accessibility Sub-Committee

Our Knowledge and information on Accessbility is driven by our passionate Accessbility Sub-Committee

Sam

Sam

Autism Representative

Tim & Ben

Tim & Ben

Camp Brouhaha (Professional Support Workers)

Alicia

Alicia

Chair User Representative

Supporting Those With Disabilities

Communication Etiquette

How we write about and speak with people with disability can have a profound effect on the individual and on community attitudes. By their very nature, some words and interactions can degrade and diminish people with disability. Others perpetuate inaccurate stereotypes, entirely removing a person’s individuality and, in some cases, their dignity.

Through positive and appropriate interactions with people with disability, we can help break down the barriers that they face in the community and in the physical environment. It is important to recognise people with disability for what they can do, rather than focusing on their limitations.

When communicating with a person with disability, rely on your common sense, and interact with people the way you would want to be treated. The fundamental principle is to put the person before the disability.

You can read more on this on our Infosheet

Assistance Animals

An assistance animal is a dog tor other animal hat is trained to assist with a disability under the Disability Discrimination Act 1992. Assistance Animal is the correct term to use in Western Australia regarding approved and accredited dogs used to assist a person with a disability to alleviate the effect of the disability and meets standards of hygiene and behaviour that are appropriate for an animal in a public place.

Participants at Blazing Swan who require the assistance of a registered assistance animal may be accompanied by their registered assistance animal where required. Identification and proof that the dog is an Approved Assistance Dog Cardholder is required.

If you are unsure if your dog is an approved Assistance Animal please contact us with your enquiry ticketing@blazingswan.com.au

There is further information on this topic under the “Assistance Animal” FAQ or our Infosheet

 

HOW TO ACT AROUND ASSISTANCE ANIMALS

Communication Etiquette

How we write about and speak with people with disability can have a profound effect on the individual and on community attitudes. By their very nature, some words and interactions can degrade and diminish people with disability. Others perpetuate inaccurate stereotypes, entirely removing a person’s individuality and, in some cases, their dignity.

Through positive and appropriate interactions with people with disability, we can help break down the barriers that they face in the community and in the physical environment. It is important to recognise people with disability for what they can do, rather than focusing on their limitations.

When communicating with a person with disability, rely on your common sense, and interact with people the way you would want to be treated. The fundamental principle is to put the person before the disability.

You can read more on this on our Infosheet